Ivan Grilo: Tomorrow, At First Light: Casa Triângulo, São Paulo, Brazil

1 June - 20 July 2019
Installation Views
Overview

 terral

participative observation; of the sky, which reminded him of the stars on the flag, national symbols, which he was not able to let go off in the investigation, of types of gates, between one cruder phase of his life, where the stars lay perforated in his mind; in regard to the protected earth, in the meridional east, in the transition of a river, in an extremely peculiar territory where the quilombo, Indian land and the community of fishermen coexist – which together hold, once a year, the most notable quilombo indigenous caiçara festival in Brazil – for underscoring within it a clear position of the tourist, even demarcating where he could retell the stories in his ethnographic treatises, as well as the governmental sign of the same name of protected land, posted in the middle of the forest, for the demarcation of indigenous land – which was crossed by the banner of the regent and, therefore, was protected by him to the point he wished; in relation to the photographs, deposited in the sumptuous cultural center of the meridional region, of the armed conflict that involved the military men of Bruzundanga and the members of the marginal socio-religious community led by Conselheiro; in regard to the red giant, a mastodonic pair of fence-cutting pliers, which made reference to those who have no land – a part of the population of that nation which is discriminated against – which for him were sui generis given his proximity with the land and the most recent data about his work (published in the annals of production of Bruzundanga conferred to them who, without any land, brought together under a single name of the landless, represent the largest producers of organic rice of the region of the planet’s Western Hemisphere with the ethnogeographic mark of languages deriving from Latin); about machismo and his intention to open a path in his ethnographic practice to a place of dia- logue with various feminine figures. The latter led him to think that he could find a space where they could raise questions that would be activated by different women. Like a sort of space in order that the man could hear.

[...] Precisely when he went through the door of the mine-shaft elevator he reflected on his political feelings: about the ambiguity of this language, the deep analysis of the venerated creature in relation to the venerator, of the pos- tures of coldness and amiability of both parties, by the doubt of experience that each of the parties had in relation to the anxieties and hopes of the relation, about the existence of frankness, about the number of tasks that existedinterposed between money and docility, in regard to the inspirations of piety and the terrible egoist acts, as well as to the loyalty of both parties, about which the parties could articulate peremptorily even without supporting evidence, about how the distrusts emerged in this nexus, how, depending on the personality in quetion, they could pacify, or not, their internal pains; how what is feared is deemed to be true, about how the ability to oneself would have a particular incli- nation for one person for the sake of another; in how we become indifferent to the vicissitudes of life, apathetic to its promise, making them banal, contingent and mortal; in short, how all of that could, concomitantly, be about love.

Tiago de Abreu Pinto

For all them that weave the wind: veiled ghosts.

[...] All together, the thoughts lasted about forty one seconds and fifty six milliseconds, and, condensedly, they spun around the lack of emphasis which, perhaps, could have been made by him in regard to the following themes: native- -tourist duality (accentuated by the time passed with that person or culture that he was studying, even though, this time, according to his own ethnographic viewpoint, depended on certain conditions for its relativity, even if there existed a minimum to be adopted, consisting of a half-dozen weeks; as well as the nature of his social position and particular pigmentation due to the small amount of melanin in his skin); folklore and legends (he believed he had mentioned somewhat superficially the names of Chico Rei, João-galafoice, José de Belchior, Proteus, Rey D. Sebastián); politics (the various political commentaries alluded to a reality not so different from that which surrounded him); ethnography (the nature of his work since he used a set of techniques for collecting multiple data about the values, beliefs, habits, and social behavior, in short, the features that concretely define a social group); orality (it assumed a revealing aspect since various fragments of his discourse were derived from excerpts, transferred precisely word by word, from conversations he had maintained in the period of his research); colloquialism (it was used, sometimes, in regard to the informal way specific social groups made use of for verbal articulation); machismo (about his effort to extinguish this evil in a work, mentioned by Audre Lorde, in The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House, alluding to Simone de Beauvoir, getting to know the genuine conditions of our lives from which we should take our force to live and our reasons for acting); narrativity (for having all his faculties concentrated on the task of presenting real or fictitious facts through the use of verbal and nonverbal signs with the aim of relating or alluding to a sequence understood by some as logic); autobiography (since his investigation was peppered here and there with personal data, some of which were public knowledge); poeticity (for activating the immense density in verbal and nonverbal signs in the fullness of the language); diegetic space (achieving the fictional world in contrast with the mimetic one); autofiction (for all the geometrically luminous fictional spectral layers related to the specific characteristics of a person and the simulacra for the mentioned construction); illusion of reference (for the mistaken mental perception of illusion due to the ambivalence existing in the data presented by his ethnographic studies); hybridity (he did not know for sure to what point that discourse was his own or of another individual he had encountered in the path of his investigations); fugue (as his discourse is composed of at least two voices that converse in counterpoint and frequently repeat one another over time); especially Egeria (the great number of inspiring forces led to forgetting to mention Mário de Andrade).

[...] In regard to: two sheets of paper ruled with lines, like writing paper, on which was spilt, on one of them, the tears of a long course of personal and professional investigation; from the book Argonauts of the Western Pacific, by Bronisław Malinowski, which to him seemed interesting for putting into practice a 

participative observation; of the sky, which reminded him of the stars on the flag, national symbols, which he was not able to let go off in the investigation, of types of gates, between one cruder phase of his life, where the stars lay perforated in his mind; in regard to the protected earth, in the meridional east, in the transition of a river, in an extremely peculiar territory where the quilombo, Indian land and the community of fishermen coexist – which together hold, once a year, the most notable quilombo indigenous caiçara festival in Brazil – for underscoring within it a clear position of the tourist, even demarcating where he could retell the stories in his ethnographic treatises, as well as the governmental sign of the same name of protected land, posted in the middle of the forest, for the demarcation of indigenous land – which was crossed by the banner of the regent and, therefore, was protected by him to the point he wished; in relation to the photographs, deposited in the sumptuous cultural center of the meridional region, of the armed conflict that involved the military men of Bruzundanga and the members of the marginal socio-religious community led by Conselheiro; in regard to the red giant, a mastodonic pair of fence-cutting pliers, which made reference to those who have no land – a part of the population of that nation which is discriminated against – which for him were sui generis given his proximity with the land and the most recent data about his work (published in the annals of production of Bruzundanga conferred to them who, without any land, brought together under a single name of the landless, represent the largest producers of organic rice of the region of the planet’s Western Hemisphere with the ethnogeographic mark of languages deriving from Latin); about machismo and his intention to open a path in his ethnographic practice to a place of dia- logue with various feminine figures. The latter led him to think that he could find a space where they could raise questions that would be activated by different women. Like a sort of space in order that the man could hear.

[...] Precisely when he went through the door of the mine-shaft elevator he reflected on his political feelings: about the ambiguity of this language, the deep analysis of the venerated creature in relation to the venerator, of the pos- tures of coldness and amiability of both parties, by the doubt of experience that each of the parties had in relation to the anxieties and hopes of the relation, about the existence of frankness, about the number of tasks that existedinterposed between money and docility, in regard to the inspirations of piety and the terrible egoist acts, as well as to the loyalty of both parties, about which the parties could articulate peremptorily even without supporting evidence, about how the distrusts emerged in this nexus, how, depending on the personality in quetion, they could pacify, or not, their internal pains; how what is feared is deemed to be true, about how the ability to oneself would have a particular incli- nation for one person for the sake of another; in how we become indifferent to the vicissitudes of life, apathetic to its promise, making them banal, contingent and mortal; in short, how all of that could, concomitantly, be about love.

Tiago de Abreu Pinto